Close

11.17.2014

UW Medicine joins state roster of Ebola-prepared hospitals

Slideshow: Harborview conducts Ebola patient simulation

By Brian Donohue  |  HSNewsBeat  |  Updated 10:15 AM, 11.17.2014

Posted in: Healthcare

  • Nurse Natalie Hare simulates taking the temperature of a prospective Ebola patient during an exercise Nov. 14 at Harborview Medical Center. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • Drs. Jeff Duchin, center, and Tim Dellit confer with a nurse during an Ebola case simulation at Harborview. Duchin is an epidemiologist with Public Health-Seattle & King County; Dellit is Harborview's associate medical director. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • SLIDESHOW: Nathan Napolitano, infection-control operations specialist, surveys a checklist as Michelle Mcintosh, an acute care registered nurse, helps colleague Natalie Hare don gloves during an Ebola simulation training session Nov. 14 at Harborview Medical Center. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • SLIDESHOW: Caregivers and infection-control monitors observe as nurses don personal protective equipment during an Ebola simulation training session Nov. 14 at Harborview Medical Center. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • SLIDESHOW: Jessica Hamilton, left, an assistant nurse manager in Harborview's intensive-care unit, and colleague Natalie Hare celebrate being finished with the 20-minute process of donning personal protective gear. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • SLIDESHOW: Nurses can wear an air-purifying respirator, shown, or a special mask covering the nose and mouth to protect themselves from airborne pathogens. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • SLIDESHOW: Vanessa Makarewicz, right, infection-control operations manager at Harborview, plays the role of the emergency medical responder handing off the prospective Ebola patient to ICU nurses during the simulation. Michelle McIntosh, left, is the trained observer, ensuring that protocols are followed, and opening doors and elevators. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • SLIDESHOW: During the Ebola case simulation, nurses Natalie Hare and Jessica Hamilton transfer the prospective patient to the intensive care unit. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • SLIDESHOW: Onlookers watch as the simulated patient receives care in a negative air pressure room. Harborview's maintenance team has installed barriers to create biocontainment zones – cold (no risk), warm (removing personal protective equipment), and hot (nearest the treatment area). (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
  • SLIDESHOW: Carolyn Blayney, clinical operations manager for patient care services, is among observers inside and outside of the room where the "patient" receives care during the Ebola simulation. Inside the room, gowned and with clipboard, is Jessica Hamilton, watching to ensure that caregivers are not exposed. (Click to enlarge.) Clare McLean
Two additional UW Medicine hospitals have joined Harborview Medical Center in adopting infection-control protocols necessary to care for prospective Ebola patients.  
Ebola-gloves
Clare McLean
Deb Metter, critical care nurse specialist and lead of Harborview's Ebola quarantine training, helps a nurse put on gloves during the exercise. (Click to enlarge.)
Deb Metter, critical care nurse specialist and lead of Harborview's Ebola quarantine training, helps a nurse put on gloves during the exercise.
UW Medical Center and Valley Medical Center are among several facilities statewide that will use guidelines established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to identify, isolate, evaluate and treat patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus disease, the Washington Department of Health announced today.

“The chance of a confirmed case of Ebola in Washington is very low, but in the event it happens we want to be sure we have the capacity to provide ongoing care to a patient,” said Dr. Kathy Lofy, state health officer. “Patients with Ebola can become critically ill and require intensive care therapy. Care needs to be delivered using strict infection-control practices.

The other facilities:
  • Harrison Medical Center, Bremerton (CHI Franciscan Health)
  • MultiCare Tacoma General Hospital
  • Providence Regional Medical Center, Everett
  • Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and Children’s Hospital, Spokane
  • Seattle Children’s
  • Swedish Medical Center, Issaquah
  • Virginia Mason Hospital, Seattle

The threat of exposure to the Ebola virus remains low. Anyone arriving in Seattle from West Africa has passed through airports that assess risk. Public health will perform temperature and symptom monitoring of potentially exposed individuals during the 21 day incubation period. Because individuals are not infectious until they develop symptoms, active monitoring for symptoms will rapidly identify anyone who has contracted Ebola and allow isolation before he or she is able to infect someone else with the virus. In the event a case is confirmed the CDC will send a team to assist the hospitals in providing care safely and effectively.
Tagged with: ebola, Harborview Medical Center, training
Contact us about this story.